Skip to Main Content
Florida Fish and Wildlife https://www.flickr.com/photos/myfwcmedia/37175665362/in/photolist-YD618C-eFHS2a-XTSZkY-eFQ3cq-eFKEfD-eFKwjV-eFPxrQ-eFHcUT-eFPWEL-eFH8xV-eFQVHE-eFHJfk-eFQTkQ-eFRASu-eFQvh5-eFR2sj-eFJdgi-bXTUmb-aCLr3p-eFJive-eFRy8G-eFJfN2-bXTXHw-bXTYY7-eFJzSt-9sHord-eFJXQr-eFQtwh-bEVMzL-eFJ4JD-eFJtWa-YD6cAY-eFHsTr-Du3xLd-Gbadat-EnLY5v-Ja8X4r-eFQQEf-Ei1Ba6-FzkHAS-DY7XrC-eFPcrA-eFPC7Q-eFQepu-cjJwd9-8BLLLb-FmuQ7P-eFHXZM-bXTW43-eFJa3M

From Glades to suburbs, South Florida historically soaked

Read the full article here.

Heavy rains and strong hurricanes have made this the wettest year in South Florida in 86 years. Water levels are unusually high in the region’s three conservation areas—such as the wetlands west of Miami-Dade and Broward counties—that normally help ease flooding. All of this rain has created a number of logistic and safety concerns as municipalities struggle to figure out what to do with the water.

Next Post:
Previous Post: