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Editorial: Aging flood-control systems can’t protect South Florida

Read the full article here.

South Florida’s current protection against rising seas includes a flood-control system built 50 to 70 years ago. Though the aging system needs significant upgrades, Congress has not yet provided money for a flood-control study it authorized for the region in 2016. This study will be critical for identifying the flood risk of different areas, which will help the state and localities create strategies for making the region more resilient by fortifying sea wells, elevating streets, upgrading sewage systems, and improving natural landscapes and habitats. At a smaller scale, local entities, like local drainage districts and homeowners associations, will need to make improvements to secondary canals under their jurisdiction.

Photo credit: Florida Sea Grant,  CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

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