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In Miami, battling sea level rise may mean surrendering land

Read the full article here: https://goo.gl/xxCWd2

Miami Beach is spending $500 million to raise more than 100 miles of roads, install pumps, build higher sea walls, and update drainage systems. The city’s mayor has pledged to spend even more on adaptation strategies if necessary to protect the $40 billion worth of properties in the area. Across the bay in Shorecrest, officials are taking a different approach—surrender developed land to nature to accommodate rising seas. Officials in Shorecrest consider this approach a longer-term solution than Miami Beach’s temporary remediation efforts.

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